Job’s Response & The Jebusites

That’s some heavy stuff there.  You, without a doubt, hate evil. 

I’ve noticed that Job’s friends never say anything good about anyone other than themselves, they don’t even say good things about You.  All they basically say about You is that You aren’t no one to mess with, and that is true.

Jebusite Wall (Millo) (2000-1000 B.C.).
The Millo is part of the City of David.
It is the rampart built by the Jebusites before David conquered the city.

The Millo consists of the terraces and retaining walls on the eastern slope of the southeastern spur that supported the buildings above.

The Millo is the Stepped Stone Structure uncovered by Kathleen Kenyon.

Eilat Mazar has uncovered the Large Stone Structure (David’s Palace) that sat on the Millo.

The Stepped Stone Structure (shown above) at what is believed to be the location of the Jebusite Wall.

This photo includes:
* A glacis, a steep sloped wall for protection, which is called the Millo in 2 Sam 5:9 from 1100-1000 B.C.
* Remains of residences from 1200 B.C.
* Retaining walls from 1200 B.C.
* Rooms used from 700-586 B.C.
* Walls built by Nehemiah.

“Then Job answered and said,

How long will ye vex my soul, and break me in pieces with words?

These ten times have ye reproached me: ye are not ashamed that ye make yourselves strange to me” (Job 19:1-3).

Ten times is often used as a round number (e.g., Gen 31:41; 1 Sam 1:8).  You make yourselves strange to me means you deal harshly with me.

“And be it indeed that I have erred, mine error remaineth with myself (Job 19:4).

If Job had erred it’s his responsibility.  His friends have no right to interfere or to behave as if they were God (see v 22).

If indeed ye will magnify yourselves against me, and plead against me my reproach:

Know now that God hath overthrown me, and hath compassed me with his net” (Job 19:5-6).

The Hebrew for overthrown is twice translated pervert in 8:3, where Bildad denied that God perverts justice.  But Job, struggling with the enigma of his suffering can only conclude that God is his enemy, though in fact He is his friend who delights in him (vs 1:8 & 2:3). 

Job’s true enemy is Satan.

Compassed me with his net – the wicked may get themselves into trouble, as Bildad had pointed out (vs 18:8-10), but Job here attributes his suffering to God.

“Behold, I cry out of wrong, but I am not heard: I cry aloud, but there is no judgment.

He hath fenced up my way that I cannot pass, and he hath set darkness in my paths.

He hath stripped me of my glory, and taken the crown from my head.

He hath destroyed me on every side, and I am gone: and mine hope hath he removed like a tree.

He hath also kindled his wrath against me, and he counteth me unto him as one of his enemies.

The House of Ahiel. This four-room house was built into and over the Millo around 650 B.C. in the days of young Josiah and Jeremiah.

The staircase to the left (seen in photos below) would have provided access to the home’s flat roof.

A stone with a hole in it was found in a corner of the small room.

This stone is the toilet seat that sat over a cesspit about 6.5 feet deep.

His troops come together, and raise up their way against me, and encamp round about my tabernacle” (Job 19:7-12).

In Job’s mind, God is at war with him.

He hath put my brethren far from me, and mine acquaintance are verily estranged from me.

A massive stepped podium for the Canaanite-Jebusite palace/fortress that was also used as David’s palace.
Eilat Mazar dates the building of this structure from the period of 1200-1000 BC.

This Stepped Stone Structure was the work of the Jebusites during the days of the Judges, and the work of David around 1000 B.C.

My kinsfolk have failed, and my familiar friends have forgotten me.

They that dwell in mine house, and my maids, count me for a stranger: I am an alien in their sight.

I called my servant, and he gave me no answer; I intreated him with my mouth.

My breath is strange to my wife, though I intreated for the children’s sake of mine own body.

Yea, young children despised me; I arose, and they spake against me.

All my inward friends abhorred me: and they whom I loved are turned against me” (Job 19:13-19).

Nothing in life hurts more than rejection by one’s family and friends.  Job’s children are gone, and his wife, brothers, friends, and servants find him repulsive.  Even young children despised him where one’s elders were to be honored and respected (Ex 20:12).

“My bone cleaveth to my skin and to my flesh, and I am escaped with the skin of my teeth” (Job 19:20).

My skin and to my flesh may refer to gums, meaning that Job’s teeth are gone.

“Have pity upon me, have pity upon me, O ye my friends; for the hand of God hath touched me.

Details of the House of Ahiel: The four columns would have supported a flat roof.
The staircase would have provided access to the flat roof.

Notice the square

box in the small room on the lower right—this is the bathroom.

The toilet seat, or the box, can be seen in photos below.

(Photo from 2010 with the pillars standing.)

Why do ye persecute me as God, and are not satisfied with my flesh?

Oh that my words were now written! oh that they were printed in a book!

That they were graven with an iron pen and lead in the rock for ever!

For I know that my redeemer liveth, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth” (Job 19:21-25).

“I know my Redeemer liveth” – this staunch confession of faith has been appropriated by generations of Christians, especially through the medium of Handel’s Messiah

Although in other contexts Job desires a defender as an advocate in heaven who would plead with God on his behalf (see 9:33-34 & 16:18-21). 

Here the Redeemer seems to be none other than God Himself.  Job expresses confidence that ultimately God will vindicate His faithful servants in the face of all false accusations.

This toilet seat sat in the corner of the small room in the House of Ahiel.
This would have provided the four room home with a bathroom.

“And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God” (Job 19:26).

Job senses that the ravages of his disease will eventually bring about his death.  He’s absolutely certain, however, that death is not the end of existence and that someday he will stand in the presence of his Redeemer and see Him with his own eyes (see v. 27; Matt 5:8; 1 Jn 3:2).

“And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God:

Whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes shall behold, and not another; though my reins be consumed within me.

But ye should say, Why persecute we him, seeing the root of the matter is found in me?

Be ye afraid of the sword: for wrath bringeth the punishments of the sword, that ye may know there is a judgmen”t (Job 19:27-29).

Job warns his friends that they should fear God’s Judgment if they continue to make false accusations against him.

The Jebusites

Who are the Jebusites?
The Jebusites were a Canaanite people (Gen 10:15-16), many of whom lived in the hills in the vicinity of their city, Jebus, better known as Jerusalem. Jerusalem is mentioned in the Egyptian Execration Texts (as Uru-shalim), the Amarna correspondence (as Urusalim) and Assyrian texts (as Urusillimmu). We know the names of two of the city kings: The Amarna texts mention Abdi-Hepa, and 2 Sam 24:18 speaks of Araunah.

The Jebusites led the southern confederation of city-states within the region against Joshua and the Israelites (Josh 9:1-2) and also participated in the northern confederation of city-states under Jabin, king of Hazor (Josh 11:1-5). Jerusalem fell between the tribal allotments of Judah and Benjamin.

Although Judah set the citadel on fire, Jebusites continued to inhabit Jerusalem into the period of the judges, since neither tribe succeeded in driving them out (Jud 1:8, 21). David was able to wrest the city from Jebusite control and use it as his religious and political capital. However, some Jebusites remained there until the days of Solomon, who conscripted them to forced labour along with other Canaanites (1 Kgs 9:20-21). They were eventually absorbed into the Israelite population.

Some excavated remains from Jerusalem are attributable to the Jebusite period. These include a fortification wall, bastions, gates and a water tunnel from the Gihon spring with a deep cistern to collect the water.

The Jebusites were a Canaanite people (Gen 10:15-16), many of whom lived in the hills in the vicinity of their city, Jebus, better known as Jerusalem.

Jer­usalem is mentioned in the Egyptian Execra­tion Texts (as Uru-shalim), the Amarna correspondence (as Urusalim) and Assyrian texts (as Urusillimmu).

We know the names of two of the city’s kings: The Amarna texts mention Abdi-Hepa, and 2 Saml 24:18 speaks of Araunah.

The Jebusites led the southern confederation of city-states within the region against Joshua and the Israelites (Josh 9:1 -2) and also participated in the northern confederation of city-states under Jabin, king of Hazor (Jos 11:1).

Jerusalem fell between the tribal allotments of Judah and Benjamin. Al­though Judah set the citadel on fire, Jebusites continued to inhabit Jerusalem into the period of the judges, since neither tribe suc­ceeded in driving them out (Jdg 1:8, 21).

David was able to wrest the city from Jebusite con­trol and use it as his religious and political capital. However, some Jebusites remained there until the days of Solomon, who con­scripted them to forced labor along with other Canaanites (1 Kgs 9:20-21). They were even­tually absorbed into the Israelite population.

Some excavated remains from Jerusalem are attributable to the Jebusite period. These include a fortification wall, bastions, gates and a water tunnel from the Gihon spring with a deep cistern to collect the water.

What does the Bible say about the Jebusites and the city of Jerusalem?

* Genesis 10:15-16 – First time the name Jebusites appeared in Bible as one of the descendants of Canaan.

* Joshua 10:1-26 – The first time that Jerusalem was mentioned in the Bible when its king, Adonizedek, lead the Jebusites along with the people from nearby cities to fight against Joshua; a war he eventually lost and in which he was killed.

* Joshua 11:3 – Numbers 13:29. Jebusites dwell in the “hill country”.

* Genesis 15:18-21 – Jebusites are among the descendants of Abram the Lord mentioned when He made a covenant with Abram.

* Exodus 3:6-8 – God rescued the people of Moses from the Egyptians and brought them to the “good and spacious” land abundant of “milk and honey” where the Jebusites resided along with five other tribes.

* Exodus 33:2 – God sent an angel to move out the six tribes, including the Jebusites, from the Promised Land.

* Deuteronomy 7:1-2 – God ordered the Israelites to completely destroy the Jebusites together with the other six mighty nations.

* Judges 1:21 – The Jebusites still live in Jerusalem with the Benjamites.

* Judges 1:8 – Jerusalem was captured by the people of Judah.

* Joshua 15:63 – Judah failed to expel the Jebusites from Jerusalem and they continued to live in the city with the children of Judah.

* Judges 19:10-11 – Jerusalem was also known as Jebus.

* 2 Samuel 5:6-10 – The Jebusites protested against King David’s arrival in Jerusalem but David invaded Zion (Jerusalem), lived in its stronghold, and called it the City of David.