The Book of the Song of Solomon

Summary of Song of Solomon

The book of Song of Solomon is a large love poem filled with smaller poems of different kinds. Solomon is the author and he wrote it sometime during his reign 970-930 B.C. It is a story of a bridegroom who is in love with his bride. Key personalities are King Solomon, the Shulammite girl, and friends.

The story greatly emphasizes the sanctity of marriage and that it is designed, blessed and consecrated in the eyes of the Lord. The purpose of “Song of Songs,” as it is also called is a picture of God’s love for His people. Although there is explicit sexual content, it is a book in which we can learn the depths of God’s authentic love for us and what should be in the sacredness of marriage.

In chapters 1-3, Solomon writes of the courtship and engagement of the Beloved (Solomon) and the Lover (Shulammite girl), “My beloved spake, and said unto me, rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away” (2:10).

Chapters 3-4, we read of the marriage ceremony of the bride to the bridegroom, “Go forth, O ye daughters of Zion, and behold King Solomon with the crown wherewith his mother crowned him in the day of his espousals, and in the day of the gladness of his heart” (3:11).

King Solomon is best known for building the Temple of Jerusalem. The description of it is elaborate and lists many costly materials, such as gold, copper, and cedar wood. It took seven years to build, and then he went on to build his palace, which took another 13 years (1 Kings 7:1).
Many say the Song of Solomon is all about sex, but it’s not.
It is about faith in God.
God is the creator of all things, including sex.
Sex may be good, but when you have faith in God then you also have the spirit with the Holy Ghost and then everything is much better and enjoyable.

Chapters 5-8, are the relationship between the husband and wife and the power of their love, “Many waters cannot quench love, neither can the floods drown it: if a man would give all the substance of his house for love, it would utterly be contemned” (8:7).