Jehovah and Job, Part 3 of 4 & Book of Enoch

Nobody understands why You allow things to happen.  I don’t know why and I’m starting to get to know You.

Jehovah and Job
Part 3 of 4

Moreover the LORD answered Job, and said,

Shall he that contendeth with the Almighty instruct him? he that reproveth God, let him answer it (Job 40:1-2).

The conclusion of the first divine discourse.  Once again, God challenges Job to answer Him.

The Book of Enoch (also 1 Enoch; Ge’ez: መጽሐፈ ሄኖክ mäts’hafä henok) is an ancient Jewish religious work, ascribed by tradition to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah, although modern scholars estimate the older sections (mainly in the Book of the Watchers) to date from about 300 B.C., and the latest part (Book of Parables) probably to the end of the first century B.C.

It is not part of the biblical canon as used by Jews, apart from Beta Israel.

Most Christian denominations and traditions may accept the Books of Enoch as having some historical or theological interest or significance, but they generally regard the Books of Enoch as non-canonical or non-inspired.

It is regarded as canonical by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church and Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, but not by any other Christian group.

It is wholly extant only in the Ge’ez language, with Aramaic fragments from the Dead Sea Scrolls and a few Greek and Latin fragments.

For this and other reasons, the traditional Ethiopian belief is that the original language of the work was Ge’ez, whereas non-Ethiopian scholars tend to assert that it was first written in either Aramaic or Hebrew; E. Isaac suggests that the Book of Enoch, like the Book of Daniel, was composed partially in Aramaic and partially in Hebrew.

No Hebrew version is known to have survived.

The book itself claims to be written by Enoch himself before the Biblical Flood.

The authors of the New Testament were familiar with the content of the story and influenced by it:

a short section of 1 Enoch (1 En 1:9 or 1 En 2:1 depending on the translation) is quoted in the New Testament (Letter of Jude 1:14–15), and is attributed there to “Enoch the Seventh from Adam” (1 En 60:8).

The text was also utilised by the community that originally collected the Dead Sea Scrolls.

“Then Job answered the LORD, and said,

Behold, I am vile; what shall I answer thee? I will lay mine hand upon my mouth. 

Once have I spoken; but I will not answer: yea, twice; but I will proceed no further.

Then answered the LORD unto Job out of the whirlwind, and said,

Gird up thy loins now like a man: I will demand of thee, and declare thou unto me.

Wilt thou also disannul my judgment? wilt thou condemn me, that thou mayest be righteous?

Hast thou an arm like God? or canst thou thunder with a voice like him?

Deck thyself now with majesty and excellency; and array thyself with glory and beauty.

Cast abroad the rage of thy wrath: and behold every one that is proud, and abase him.

Look on every one that is proud, and bring him low; and tread down the wicked in their place.

Hide them in the dust together; and bind their faces in secret.

Then will I also confess unto thee that thine own right hand can save thee.

Behold now behemoth, which I made with thee; he eateth grass as an ox.

Lo now, his strength is in his loins, and his force is in the navel of his belly.

He moveth his tail like a cedar: the sinews of his stones are wrapped together.

His bones are as strong pieces of brass; his bones are like bars of iron.

He is the chief of the ways of God: he that made him can make his sword to approach unto him.

Surely the mountains bring him forth food, where all the beasts of the field play.

He lieth under the shady trees, in the covert of the reed, and fens.

The shady trees cover him with their shadow; the willows of the brook compass him about.

Behold, he drinketh up a river, and hasteth not: he trusteth that he can draw up Jordan into his mouth.

He taketh it with his eyes: his nose pierceth through snares” (Job 40:3-24).

Book of Enoch

Question: “What is the book of Enoch and should it be in the Bible?”

Answer: The Book of Enoch is any of several pseudepigraphal (falsely attributed works, texts whose claimed authorship is unfounded) works that attribute themselves to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah; that is, Enoch son of Jared (Gen 5:18).

Enoch is also one of the two people in the Bible taken up to heaven without dying (the other being Elijah), as the Bible says

And Enoch walked with God, and he was not; for God took him (Gen 5:24; see also Heb 11:5).

Most commonly, the phrase “Book of Enoch” refers to 1 Enoch, which is wholly extant only in the Ethiopic language.

The biblical book of Jude quotes from the Book of Enoch:

And Enoch also, the seventh from Adam, prophesied of these, saying, Behold, the Lord cometh with ten thousands of his saints,

To execute judgment upon all, and to convince all that are ungodly among them of all their ungodly deeds which they have ungodly committed, and of all their hard speeches which ungodly sinners have spoken against him (Jude 14-15).

But this does not mean the Book of Enoch is inspired by God and should be in the Bible.

Cave 4 at Qumran, Israel, where 15,000 fragments from over 200 books were found.
Four copies of the Astronomical Book were found (4Q208-211).

Seven manuscripts contain fragments of the other sections of the Book of Enoch.

4QEna and 4QEnb (4Q201, 202) only contain fragments of the Book of the Watchers.

4QEnd and 4QEne (4Q205, 206) combine fragments of the Book of the Watchers, the Book of Dreams, and the end of the Epistle and the Book of Noah (104-107), 4QEnf (4Q207) contains a fragment of the Book of Dreams, and 4QEng (4Q212) consists of fragments of the Epistle.

There were also two fragmentary copies of the Book of Giants found in cave 1 (1Q23-24), one from cave 2 (2Q26), and five from cave 4 (4Q203, 530-33).

Jude’s quote is not the only quote in the Bible from a non-biblical source.

The Apostle Paul quotes Epimenides in Tit 1:12 but that does not mean we should give any additional authority to Epimenides’ writings.

The same is true with Jude, vv 14-15. Jude quoting from the book of Enoch does not indicate the entire Book of Enoch is inspired, or even true.

All it means is that particular verse is true. It is interesting to note that no scholars believe the Book of Enoch to have truly been written by the Enoch in the Bible.

Enoch was seven generations from Adam, prior to the Flood (Gen 5:1-24). Evidently, though, this was genuinely something that Enoch prophesied – or the Bible would not attribute it to him,

Enoch, the seventh from Adam, prophesied about these men… (Jude 14).

This saying of Enoch was evidently handed down by tradition, and eventually recorded in the Book of Enoch.

We should treat the Book of Enoch (and the other books like it) in the same manner we do the other Apocryphal writings.

Some of what the Apocrypha says is true and correct, but at the same time, much of it is false and historically inaccurate.

If you read these books, you have to treat them as interesting but fallible historical documents, not as the inspired, authoritative Word of God.

The above information came from “Got Questions.com.”  I personally have no knowledge of the Book of Enoch, other than the many places I have read about it.

I do agree with the above article due to other studies I have done of similar matters, but also because I have checked many different subjects with this site and never once did they give an incorrect or even partially correct answer.

Therefore, they know God well, as I do, or we are both lunatics and haven’t a clue who God is.